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Adrienne Pinsoneault

Adrienne Pinsoneault

2015 Fellow
Luis Valdez Leadership Academy
San Jose, California

Teaching Discipline

Forensic Science

Why Science

“Many students see science as a set body of facts, but in reality, it is an ever growing body of knowledge that is added to daily. The ability to look at situations critically is a skill that is valuable not only in science but in any situation. I want my students to always be questioning why things are the way that they are.”

Volunteer Experience

Through Science in Action, Adrienne taught hands-on science activities to local elementary school students. As an English as a Second Language (ESL) Conversation Partner in the ESL Department at Gonzaga University, she helped ESL students strengthen their English skills. 

Professional Experience

During her undergraduate studies, Adrienne worked as a Research Assistant, conducting research on skin glands in a recently discovered salamander species (Karseniakoreana). She also studied the population genetics of the Brook Stickleback (Culaea inconstans), an invasive species in eastern Washington state. After graduation, she joined the Jesuit Volunteer Corps. Through the program, she worked as a Youth Education Coordinator at a local community center. During her tenure, she helped the center add science enrichment to their after school program and a science class to their academic summer camp. Most notably, she fell in love with teaching. Next, Adrienne worked as an Energy Assistance Specialist at Hopelink. In this role, she pledged funds to clients as part of a low-income energy bill assistance program. Prior to beginning graduate studies, Adrienne spent 10 months working as an English Teaching Assistant in Panguipulli, Chile through English Opens Doors

Hobbies

Adrienne enjoys basketball, reading and exploring outdoors.

Academic Background

  • Stanford University (Master of Arts in Education)
  • Gonzaga University (Bachelor of Science in Biology and Spanish) 

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As teachers, we are not only there to transmit information to students but to guide them in developing life skills that will contribute to science, or any other discipline. We are responsible for preparing them for the world that exists now but also for the better one that we hope it can be in the future.

Adrienne Pinsoneault
2015 Fellow